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2013 is Heading Toward 'AIDS-Free Generation'

Dec 02, 2012 09:24 AM EST

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World AIDS Day began in 1987 drawing the attention of public to the disease that had only been identified six years earlier.

Always December stands as the reminder of the human face of a global epidemic. Around the world 34 million people affected and died already with this disease. Now recently, in LA five Gay men were affected by rare form of Pneumonia rather than AIDS. 

"This is the one day that we have the entire world's attention because, after today, people go back into their little cocoons, if you will, and kind of go back to ignoring HIV," said Hawkins, a researcher.

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"We want to make every day World AIDS Day." He added. 

AIDS Resource Council conducted an Annual Service to remember the people who are affected by AIDS and who are no more. 

According to the report, basically HIV targets the immune system and weakens the ability of the body to fight off infections and cancer. This issue is a serious one that every people have to be aware of and this part has to be considered,

In SF the AIDS crisis helped a lot and it was supportive, the report added. 

In addition, doctors reported in the peer-reviewed medical journal "Blood" that tests "strongly suggest that the cure of HIV has been achieved in this patient," for this month. 

There are cautions of course, the problem is the monitor skill, but those are improving as well. 

Another pioneering AIDS scientist, Dr. Paul Volberding, cautions, "The Berlin patient is a fascinating story. It's not one that can be generalized. You don't want to go out and get a bone marrow transplant. And the bone marrow transplants themselves carry a real risk of mortality."

"It's really been waking a whole lot of people up to the stigma of HIV and AIDS and getting people to understand it's not a disease to ignore anymore," said Allen, a therapist. 

Panelists talked about deep subjects, such as informing family and signifing others of their diagnosis, as well as the stereotypes of HIV.

Blue, a 23-year-old from Baltimore, said people expect a man with HIV to weigh "10 pounds" and have a gaunt face. That's not the case, he said.

"I don't look like that," Blue continued. "You've got to educate yourself."

In addition, "If you do find out you're HIV positive, it's not the end of the world," said Dominic Stewart an18-year-old panelist.

"It's actually the beginning." He added. 

 

 

 

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